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A house with a stone exterior, red roof, and chimney surrounded by trees.
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin East in Spring Green, WI.
Flickr Creative Commons/Kevin Tao

Tour Frank Lloyd Wright designs in his home state of Wisconsin

Just a few hours drive from Chicago, see the heart of Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs.

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin East in Spring Green, WI.
| Flickr Creative Commons/Kevin Tao

The iconic architect Frank Lloyd Wright was born not far from Madison, Wisconsin in a small town called Richland Center. The Prairie School designer went on to create homes and buildings across the world, but the heart of his work remains in the Midwest. This list of Wright designs located near Madison, which is about a two and a half hour drive from Chicago, is a mix of well-known tourist attractions like the Frank Lloyd Wright Visitor Center and perhaps off-the-beaten-path locations like Midway Barn.

The architect’s fingerprints are everywhere in Wisconsin—classic Wright patterns appear on highway overpasses, bridges, and gift shop accoutrement. Hop in a car and follow a designated route to see his handiwork. Along the way, you’ll be able to see a range of Wright’s work: early designs, final work, and under-the-radar sites.

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1. Monona Terrace

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1 John Nolen Dr
Madison, WI 53703

When Wright first designed this impressive civic center in 1938, he said, “It will never be built in my lifetime,” and he was right. World War II brought the project to a halt, and amid rejection from voters, the complex seemed to be doomed. It was finally brought back to life and constructed in 1997, but without Wright’s preliminary suggestions of a rail depot, marina, and courthouse. It is said that he only earned $250 for the project. There is a lakefront bike path that wraps around the Terrace and a public tour of the site.

2. Robert Lamp House

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22 N Butler St
Madison, WI 53703

Located on Madison's isthmus, this home was designed by Wright in 1903 for his childhood friend Robert Lamp. At the time, Wright had a heavy workload and handed off the execution of the project to colleague Walter Burley Griffin so it’s considered a hybrid of Griffin and Wright’s designs. A little walking is required to see the exterior, other nearby houses shield it from stree tview.

3. The “Airplane” House

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120 Ely Pl
Madison, WI 53726

One of Wright’s earlier home designs in Wisconsin, the Eugene A. Gilmore house is referred to as “the Airplane House” by locals for its wing-like features. It was completed in 1908 for Gilmore, a professor at the University of Chicago, and his wife. Positioned on top of a hill, take a drive to see the home and unparalleled views of Madison.

4. First Unitarian Society Meeting House

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900 University Bay Dr
Madison, WI 53705

With pointed, geometric features and not a piece of stained glass in sight, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unitarian Meeting House certainly doesn’t fit the bill of a traditional church. It was completed in 1951 by Marshall Erdman, a local builder. A collaboration between Erdman and Wright came out of the Meeting House project—building prefab houses. There are tours offered of the landmark, which also holds regular services.

5. Usonia 1

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441 Toepfer Ave
Madison, WI 53711

In the wake of the Great Depression, Wright began to visualize an America dotted with reasonably-priced homes, as a sort of utopia. He called his vision “Usonia,” derived from United States of America. The first of Wright’s 140 Usonian homes can be found in Madison. The 1,550-square-foot dwelling was built in 1937 for Herbert Jacobs, a newspaper reporter, and his wife, Katherine. Tours are available.

6. Van Tamelen House

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5817 Anchorage Ave
Madison, WI 53705

This 2,000-square-foot prefab home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright was completed and constructed in 1956 by Wright’s protege Marshall Erdman. Residents have been living in the home ever since, including a former employee of Marshall Erdman and Wright devotee who purchased it in 1974, adding several Wright-inspired bird baths and lights.

The exterior of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Van Tamelen House. The facade is tan brick with a red roof. Pinterest

7. Herbert and Katherine Jacobs Second House

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Jacobs II House, 3995 Shawn Trail
Middleton, WI 53562

In 1944, Wright designed another home for Herbert and Katherine Jacobs, this time locating it in a suburb right outside of Madison. The house, often referred to as “Jacobs II” or, as Wright called it, the “Solar Hemicycle,” was designed to receive optimal levels of sunlight throughout the day. The private home is tucked back on a quiet road and is slightly shrouded by trees, but you won’t be able to miss the historical marker or the unmistakably-Wright features.

8. Seth Peterson Cottage

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Fern Dell Rd
Baraboo, WI 53913

Just outside the Wisconsin Dells, Wright designed a picturesque 880-square-foot cottage. Built in 1958, the home was commissioned by Seth Peterson, who unfortunately passed away before it was completed. Sitting on Mirror Lake, it’s one of Wright’s final designs and is one of the few that can be booked for overnight rentals.

9. Hillside Studio & Theater

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5607 County Hwy C
Spring Green, WI 53588

This cluster of buildings started with a boarding school that Wright designed for his aunts in 1902. When they eventually retired from the school, Wright repurposed the complex as a community for his apprentices and students. It includes a drafting studio, assembly hall, theater, and dining hall. Students continue to reside at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture and may be seen working from May through October.

The exterior of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hillside Studio and Theater. The facade is tan brick with a red brick and red decorative details. Wikimedia Commons

10. Taliesin

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5481 County Rd C
Spring Green, WI 53588

Wright called many places across the United States home, but his mind always drifted back to the 800 acres his grandparents homesteaded near Spring Green. He once said, “I still feel myself as much a part of it as the trees and birds and bees are, and the red barns.” That’s where he built his home, Taliesin, which was finished in 1911. Among other buildings and family dwellings on the estate, Wright spent his days drawing and taking in the bucolic scenery. Several tour options are available of the Taliesin grounds.

11. Midway Barn

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6604 WI-23
Spring Green, WI 53588

Located between Taliesin and Hillside Studio & Theater (hence the name “Midway”), Wright designed this barn in 1949 to serve as the focal point of agricultural operations on the estate. The geometrically-detailed Milking Tower adds Wright’s trademark flair to what was otherwise a typical country barn.

12. Wyoming Valley School

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6306 WI-23 Trunk
Spring Green, WI 53588

A few minutes from Taliesin lies the only public elementary school Wright designed. Completed in 1957, the architect took it on as a pro-bono project and included elements like a dual-sided fireplace, large oak beams, and floor-to-ceiling windows. Students attended the school until 1989 when was closed. It now serves as a cultural arts center offering workshops, performances, and lectures, and tours are offered on the weekend.

13. The Frank Lloyd Wright Visitor Center

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5607 County Rd C
Spring Green, WI 53588

Now serving as Taliesin Preservation’s Visitor Center, this structure was once a restaurant designed by Wright. Called Riverview Terrace, construction was completed in 1967, eight years after Wright’s death. Before its grand opening, former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson hosted a dinner there.

14. Unity Chapel

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6596 Co Hwy Z
Spring Green, WI 53588

One of Wright’s uncles was a Unitarian minister and asked him to design this building in 1886. As a 19-year-old, this is one of Wright’s earliest interior projects. Here at the grounds of the church is where many of Wright’s family members are buried. If you visit the small structure, there are tours of the chapel upon request.

15. Tan-Y-Deri

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6604 WI-23
Spring Green, WI 53588

The property is named after a Welsh phrase meaning “under the oaks.” Wright designed this shake-shingled home for his sister Jane and her family. With his aunts’ school also on the property, the land had truly become a family estate. It sits next to the Romeo and Juliet Windmill, commissioned by Wright’s aunts to pump water at the school.

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1. Monona Terrace

1 John Nolen Dr, Madison, WI 53703

When Wright first designed this impressive civic center in 1938, he said, “It will never be built in my lifetime,” and he was right. World War II brought the project to a halt, and amid rejection from voters, the complex seemed to be doomed. It was finally brought back to life and constructed in 1997, but without Wright’s preliminary suggestions of a rail depot, marina, and courthouse. It is said that he only earned $250 for the project. There is a lakefront bike path that wraps around the Terrace and a public tour of the site.

1 John Nolen Dr
Madison, WI 53703

2. Robert Lamp House

22 N Butler St, Madison, WI 53703

Located on Madison's isthmus, this home was designed by Wright in 1903 for his childhood friend Robert Lamp. At the time, Wright had a heavy workload and handed off the execution of the project to colleague Walter Burley Griffin so it’s considered a hybrid of Griffin and Wright’s designs. A little walking is required to see the exterior, other nearby houses shield it from stree tview.

22 N Butler St
Madison, WI 53703

3. The “Airplane” House

120 Ely Pl, Madison, WI 53726

One of Wright’s earlier home designs in Wisconsin, the Eugene A. Gilmore house is referred to as “the Airplane House” by locals for its wing-like features. It was completed in 1908 for Gilmore, a professor at the University of Chicago, and his wife. Positioned on top of a hill, take a drive to see the home and unparalleled views of Madison.

120 Ely Pl
Madison, WI 53726

4. First Unitarian Society Meeting House

900 University Bay Dr, Madison, WI 53705

With pointed, geometric features and not a piece of stained glass in sight, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unitarian Meeting House certainly doesn’t fit the bill of a traditional church. It was completed in 1951 by Marshall Erdman, a local builder. A collaboration between Erdman and Wright came out of the Meeting House project—building prefab houses. There are tours offered of the landmark, which also holds regular services.

900 University Bay Dr
Madison, WI 53705

5. Usonia 1

441 Toepfer Ave, Madison, WI 53711

In the wake of the Great Depression, Wright began to visualize an America dotted with reasonably-priced homes, as a sort of utopia. He called his vision “Usonia,” derived from United States of America. The first of Wright’s 140 Usonian homes can be found in Madison. The 1,550-square-foot dwelling was built in 1937 for Herbert Jacobs, a newspaper reporter, and his wife, Katherine. Tours are available.

441 Toepfer Ave
Madison, WI 53711

6. Van Tamelen House

5817 Anchorage Ave, Madison, WI 53705
The exterior of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Van Tamelen House. The facade is tan brick with a red roof. Pinterest

This 2,000-square-foot prefab home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright was completed and constructed in 1956 by Wright’s protege Marshall Erdman. Residents have been living in the home ever since, including a former employee of Marshall Erdman and Wright devotee who purchased it in 1974, adding several Wright-inspired bird baths and lights.

5817 Anchorage Ave
Madison, WI 53705

7. Herbert and Katherine Jacobs Second House

Jacobs II House, 3995 Shawn Trail, Middleton, WI 53562

In 1944, Wright designed another home for Herbert and Katherine Jacobs, this time locating it in a suburb right outside of Madison. The house, often referred to as “Jacobs II” or, as Wright called it, the “Solar Hemicycle,” was designed to receive optimal levels of sunlight throughout the day. The private home is tucked back on a quiet road and is slightly shrouded by trees, but you won’t be able to miss the historical marker or the unmistakably-Wright features.

Jacobs II House, 3995 Shawn Trail
Middleton, WI 53562

8. Seth Peterson Cottage

Fern Dell Rd, Baraboo, WI 53913

Just outside the Wisconsin Dells, Wright designed a picturesque 880-square-foot cottage. Built in 1958, the home was commissioned by Seth Peterson, who unfortunately passed away before it was completed. Sitting on Mirror Lake, it’s one of Wright’s final designs and is one of the few that can be booked for overnight rentals.

Fern Dell Rd
Baraboo, WI 53913

9. Hillside Studio & Theater

5607 County Hwy C, Spring Green, WI 53588
The exterior of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hillside Studio and Theater. The facade is tan brick with a red brick and red decorative details. Wikimedia Commons

This cluster of buildings started with a boarding school that Wright designed for his aunts in 1902. When they eventually retired from the school, Wright repurposed the complex as a community for his apprentices and students. It includes a drafting studio, assembly hall, theater, and dining hall. Students continue to reside at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture and may be seen working from May through October.

5607 County Hwy C
Spring Green, WI 53588

10. Taliesin

5481 County Rd C, Spring Green, WI 53588

Wright called many places across the United States home, but his mind always drifted back to the 800 acres his grandparents homesteaded near Spring Green. He once said, “I still feel myself as much a part of it as the trees and birds and bees are, and the red barns.” That’s where he built his home, Taliesin, which was finished in 1911. Among other buildings and family dwellings on the estate, Wright spent his days drawing and taking in the bucolic scenery. Several tour options are available of the Taliesin grounds.

5481 County Rd C
Spring Green, WI 53588

11. Midway Barn

6604 WI-23, Spring Green, WI 53588

Located between Taliesin and Hillside Studio & Theater (hence the name “Midway”), Wright designed this barn in 1949 to serve as the focal point of agricultural operations on the estate. The geometrically-detailed Milking Tower adds Wright’s trademark flair to what was otherwise a typical country barn.

6604 WI-23
Spring Green, WI 53588

12. Wyoming Valley School

6306 WI-23 Trunk, Spring Green, WI 53588

A few minutes from Taliesin lies the only public elementary school Wright designed. Completed in 1957, the architect took it on as a pro-bono project and included elements like a dual-sided fireplace, large oak beams, and floor-to-ceiling windows. Students attended the school until 1989 when was closed. It now serves as a cultural arts center offering workshops, performances, and lectures, and tours are offered on the weekend.

6306 WI-23 Trunk
Spring Green, WI 53588

13. The Frank Lloyd Wright Visitor Center

5607 County Rd C, Spring Green, WI 53588

Now serving as Taliesin Preservation’s Visitor Center, this structure was once a restaurant designed by Wright. Called Riverview Terrace, construction was completed in 1967, eight years after Wright’s death. Before its grand opening, former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson hosted a dinner there.

5607 County Rd C
Spring Green, WI 53588

14. Unity Chapel

6596 Co Hwy Z, Spring Green, WI 53588

One of Wright’s uncles was a Unitarian minister and asked him to design this building in 1886. As a 19-year-old, this is one of Wright’s earliest interior projects. Here at the grounds of the church is where many of Wright’s family members are buried. If you visit the small structure, there are tours of the chapel upon request.

6596 Co Hwy Z
Spring Green, WI 53588

15. Tan-Y-Deri

6604 WI-23, Spring Green, WI 53588

The property is named after a Welsh phrase meaning “under the oaks.” Wright designed this shake-shingled home for his sister Jane and her family. With his aunts’ school also on the property, the land had truly become a family estate. It sits next to the Romeo and Juliet Windmill, commissioned by Wright’s aunts to pump water at the school.

6604 WI-23
Spring Green, WI 53588